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One Day University with the Dallas Morning News - Oct 26, 2013
October 26,2013

Dallas Morning News and One Day U 

 

Highlights from the May 11 One Day University in Dallas



One Day University and The Dallas Morning News have partnered to bring you a fascinating day of learning. Our adult "students-for-a-day" will choose the five presentations they want to attend from the list of classes and professors below.

 

 

Tentative Schedule of Classes and Professors

 

9:30am - 10:30am

The Genius of Mozart
Craig Wright / Yale University

Foreign Policy in 2014 and Beyond
Steven Lamy / University of Southern California

10:45am - 11:45am

The Abundance of Shakespeare 
Peter Saccio / Dartmouth College

The Science of Personality: Why We Behave the Way We Do
Brian Little / Cambridge University

Noon - 1:00pm

John F. Kennedy: Imagining a Second Term
Richard Pious / Barnard College / Columbia  University

What is the Internet Doing to Our Children?
Anne Nelson / Columbia University

1:00 - 2:00pm: Lunch Available for Purchase

 

2:15pm - 3:15pm

What is Modern Art?
Ori Soltes / Georgetown University

America in the Gilded Age
John Cooper / University of Wisconsin

3:30pm - 4:30pm

John F. Kennedy: Imagining a Second Term
Richard Pious / Columbia University

What Do Economists Really Know?
Ed Skelton / Southern Methodist University

 

Course Descriptions

Music
The Genius of Mozart
Craig Wright / Yale University

When asked to provide a list of “geniuses” in Western cultural history, most respondents would include the name Mozart, likely along with others such as Leonardo, Newton, Einstein, and Picasso. Say the word “prodigy,” and Mozart again immediately comes to mind. But what is it that makes Mozart great? Actually, this is a twofold question, the answers to which we will pursue: What is it in Mozart’s music that makes it among the most sublime ever written? What personal traits did Mozart possess that enabled him to create music of this extraordinary quality?

Using live music and video clips from operas, as well as from the film Amadeus, we will explore the enormous diversity of Mozart’s music. At the same time, by examining color photographs of his autograph manuscripts and draft sketches, we will witness Mozart’s attention to the smallest detail. Having explored his music in both breadth and depth, our attention turns finally to the enablers of Mozart’s genius: genetic gifts, mentoring, motivation, concentration, self-confidence, and just plain luck. By the end of this session, we will come to see that not only is Mozart’s music great, but Mozart himself was unique, and arguably the most extraordinary creator ever to set foot on this planet.

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Foreign Policy
Foreign Policy in 2014 and Beyond
Steven Lamy / University of Southern California

Globalization has blurred the distinction between domestic and foreign policy and it has increased our vulnerability in many policy areas. Yet, most Americans remain dangerously disinterested in foreign affairs. So, with a political system that is hopelessly polarized, what role will the US play in the world in the next few years? Will we control the agenda, cooperate and shape the agenda with our core allies or will we gradually withdraw from our role as the leading nation-state in global affairs? In this lecture we will review the strategies and traditions that have shaped U.S. foreign policy since the end of Cold War and we will review the key challenges our leaders will face in the next few years.

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Literature
The Abundance of Shakespeare
Peter Saccio / Dartmouth College

Shakespeare is famous for stimulating multiple interpretations, especially when events in a given play seem to evoke current issues. Using clips from the film versions of Henry V by Laurence Olivier (1944) and Kenneth Branagh (1989), and famous speeches from the play itself, the lecture explores the richness of Shakespeare and the ways in which his play, staging events of 1415 and first performed in 1599, has spoken to our own times.

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Psychology
The Science of Personality: Why We Behave the Way We Do
Brian Little / Cambridge University

Why did my normally shy and reticent husband do what he did last Thursday? Why did my nasty, brutish and short brother rise to that occasion with such warmth and largesse? For the last ten months, people have myself. Who else could I possibly be? Such questions are intriguing and consequential for understanding ourselves and other selves. This presentation provides guidelines for answering them based on theoretical work on free traits, personal projects and wellbeing. A central tenet of this perspective is that individuals often act out of character in order to advance their personal projects. An introverted mom becomes a raging extravert at her daughter s birthday party. A normally sweet colleague turns temporarily sour. A neurotic neighbor is surprisingly stable for all of February. Such behavior may puzzle us and we wonder what is going on. What is going on is both complex and deeply human. Acting out of character can bring us great pleasure. It can also bring us to our knees.

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Political Science
John F. Kennedy: Imagining A Second Term
Richard Pious / Barnard College / Columbia University


Had Kennedy lived to win a second term against Barry Goldwater, would he have continued the existing deployment of special forces in Vietnam, or would he had escalated the war? Absent a major escalation, would he have been able to “fine tune” the economy, or would it have overheated anyway, leading to the fiscal and currency crises that overtook the Nixon presidency? Would Kennedy have expanded the New Frontier program and equaled LBJ's commitment to civil and voting rights, and if so, could he have done so in ways that would have been politically sustainable? Or would American politics have polarized as it actually did? In this lecture Richard Pious considers whether a two-term Kennedy presidency would have altered anything fundamental in American foreign and domestic policies, and to what extent the assassination marked a fundamental turning point in American history.

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Public Affairs
What is the Internet Doing to Our Children?
Anne Nelson / Bard College

Over the past two decades, a tidal wave of digital media has swept into our lives. As the first generation of digital natives reaches maturity, it is clear that no population has experienced a greater impact than our children. The Internet has opened up vast new vistas of experiences and education, but it has also shown its dark side. There is growing concern over cyberstalking and cyberbullying, as well as new behaviors that defy old norms of cognition and social interaction. Drawing on over a decade of teaching and research, this course explores how digital media is affecting learning and behavior, pointing to promising innovations, best practices, and warning signs for families and educators.

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Art
What is Modern Art?
Ori Soltes / Georgetown University

This course will make lavish use of visual images to address questions of definition that are both intriguing and important to our understanding of what we humans are all about. What is art, in the first place? What is it that makes modern art "modern": when does "modern art" begin and what principles of style, subject and symbol shape it? Who are some of its important practitioners? And why should we want to answer--or at least address--these questions?

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Economics
What do Economists Really Know?
Ed Skelton / Southern Methodist University

In "What Do Economists Really Know?" discussions will revolve around the positions on which economists generally agree and why there is a disconnect between what economists believe and what the public believes. The topics will include the foundations of economic analysis, beating the stock market, free trade, and the importance of incentives. The art of forecasting will be outlined, including how economists develop forecasts and the factors that lead to forecasts being accurate or inaccurate. We will also discuss how policymakers make decisions and why those decisions sometimes turn out badly. Particular attention will be paid to monetary policy and the Federal Reserve Bank. The session will close by outlining an economic plan that would be endorsed by economists.

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Hilton Anatole - Dallas
2201 North Stemmons Freeway
Dallas , TX 75207
October 26,2013
9:30 AM - 4:30 PM